Steven Yellin Interview 118

Steven Yellin began his athletic career playing tennis at the age of 12. He competed locally and nationally and won the Florida state high school singles championship in 1971 and was a member of the winning championship team. Recruited heavily, he chose the University of Pennsylvania where he was the number one player on the team. He was a member of the All-Ivy League tennis team in 1973 and had a win over John McEnroe in a dual match during his college career.

As a senior at Penn, Yellin had an extraordinary Zone experience that radically changed his understanding of sports. It was an experience unlike anything he ever experienced on the court before. Though he played on a level never before attained, he realized that the factors that precipitated this experience was something that was not taught in any lesson he had ever taken (and he had taken quite a few!), and for that matter not taught in sports anywhere.

For the next 35 years, he worked on developing a systematic program that allow athletes in every sport to set up the very subtle experience in their mind that allows for Zone experiences. Though he teaches something from a mental level, his program is not based on sports psychology, but rather on a crucial neurophysiological experience that has to occur in an athletes mind in order to play on an exceptionally high level. The inner feeling when athletes have this experience is that time slows down, the intellect becomes quiet and the motion becomes effortless.

Steven has recently worked with Scott McCarron and the result was winning the Allianz Championship for his third PGA Champions Tour victory in his past 17 starts.

Steven talks to us about getting in the zone to play with a free swing and fluid motion.